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Name Flood
Number of Object records 0.0
Number of Photo records 6.0
Number of Archive records 0.0
Number of Library records 0.0

Associated Records

Image of B190-Strm Div 12-157 - Street Flooding Franklin Avenue

B190-Strm Div 12-157 - Street Flooding Franklin Avenue

Looking west on Franklin Avenue from Bronson Avenue, Western and Franklin Avenue streetcar stalled due to street flooding. Automobiles, pedestrians, Haig's Market, radio store. More than six inches of rain fell on March 2, 1938 throughout Southern California, causing widespread flooding throughout Los Angeles County. Rain continued intermittently for several days.

Image of B-190Strm8-163 - Lankershim Flood Damage

B-190Strm8-163 - Lankershim Flood Damage

A new chanel created by flood, looking upstream from south approach of Lankershim Boulevard Bridge that was destroyed the flooding of the Los Angeles River in March 1938. (Complete file number is B190-StormDrainDivisionSheet08-163)

Image of B-190StormDiv 3-02 - Stonehurst Avenue Bridge destroyed

B-190StormDiv 3-02 - Stonehurst Avenue Bridge destroyed

Stonehurst Avenue Bridge destroyed by flood of March 2, looking southeast from road. More than six inches of rain fell throughout Southern California on March 2, 1938. Bridges were destroyed, highways sank, houses collapsed, and landslides were triggered throughout the city. From the San Gabriel Valley to the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Palisades existing storm control drainage was no match for the overwhelming downpour..

Image of B190StormDiv8-32 - Magnolia Avenue flooding

B190StormDiv8-32 - Magnolia Avenue flooding

View from west end of Magnolia Avenue Bridge over Tujuna Wash at Westpark Drive, looking south, showing washout of bridge. People gathered to watch. More than six inches of rain fell throughout Southern California on March 2, 1938. Bridges were destroyed, highways sank, houses collapsed, and landslides were triggered throughout the city. From the San Gabriel Valley to the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Palisades existing storm control drainage was no match for the overwhelming downpour.

Image of B190StormDiv8-33 - Tujunga Wash

B190StormDiv8-33 - Tujunga Wash

Tujunga Wash looking southeast in North Hollywood. More than six inches of rain fell throughout Southern California on March 2, 1938. Bridges were destroyed, highways sank, houses collapsed, and landslides were triggered throughout the city. From the San Gabriel Valley to the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Palisades existing storm control drainage was no match for the overwhelming downpour.